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Being tongue tied isn’t just a figure of speech. For people with a tongue tie, speaking, eating, and dentition may be affected by a small piece tissue sitting under the tongue.  A tongue tie, or “ankyloglossia,” is a condition where there is a thick, tight, and/or shortened band of tissue called the lingual frenum that…

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Beginning Stage: Cubes of hard cheese such as cheddar, Monterrey jack, and American Cubes of white meat, chicken roll, and turkey roll Partially cooked carrots, potatoes, green beans – cubed or cut in lengths for biting Grilled cheese sandwiches – cubes or strips French toast – cubes or strips Firm omelets – cubes or strips…

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All children develop speech and language skills at different times. We as speech language pathologists, however, become concerned when children are falling significantly below their age level for both understanding and talking. Here are a few guidelines you can use to see if your children are developing speech and language skills appropriately:7 months – 1…

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Cleft lip and palate are birth defects that occur during the first 3 months of pregnancy when parts of the lip or palate do not completely fuse together. A cleft lip is an opening in the lip and a cleft palate is an opening in the roof of the mouth. While speech problems are common…

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Cleft lip and palate are birth defects that happen while a baby is developing in the uterus. During the 6th to 10th week of pregnancy, the bones and tissues of a baby’s upper jaw, nose, and mouth normally come together (fuse) to form the roof of the mouth and the upper lip. If the tissue…

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Sippy cups can be a great way for your baby to transition from nursing or bottle-feeding to a regular cup. They can also help improve hand-to-mouth coordination. When your baby has the motor skills to handle a cup, but not the skills to keep the drink from spilling, a sippy cup can give some independence…

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The young child who is still struggling to master certain sounds, vocabulary, sentence arrangement and the social pressures of talking will naturally stumble over speech more often than adults or older children. Because children with normal disfluencies show many of the same behaviors found in stuttering, it may be difficult for you to distinguish normal…

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Carly Morris, MA, CCC–SLP Received her Bachelor’s degree in Communication Sciences and Disorder from the Pennsylvania State University, followed by Master of Arts in Speech and Hearing Sciences from the University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign. While in graduate school, Carly received a training scholarship to research and explore relationships between parents and children, with emphasis on…

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Phonemic awareness is the ability to hear, identify, and manipulate individual sounds (phonemes) in spoken words. A great phonological awareness activity is rhyming! Help your child fill-in some new rhymes. Since you are focusing on sound and not meaning, nonsense is fine. Have fun! A tree with a …bee. A cat with a …bat. A…

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